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Using native timbers for smoking meat 
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Post Using native timbers for smoking meat
I was just wondering if anyone has used different native timbers for smoking meats & if so which ones are good & what flavor do they impart.
Obviously eucalyptus is a fairly strong taste :)

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Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:11 pm
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
Lemon Myrtle or eucalypt for fish and eel.

Any of the stronger scented woods in moderation of course.

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Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:46 pm
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
On the weekend we visited an old German property from the 1850's - they had not one but two 'smoking trees' - big old 300-400 yr old redgums that had hollow bases. The pig was hung up in the hollow, sawdust lit underneath, any holes closed over with corrugated and left to smoke for about 5 days. Our mouths were salivating at the thought - guessing they would have used redgum sawdust as that was the main tree utilised for everything in that area.

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Mon Jul 25, 2011 9:38 am
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
Aurora wrote:
On the weekend we visited an old German property from the 1850's - they had not one but two 'smoking trees' - big old 300-400 yr old redgums that had hollow bases. The pig was hung up in the hollow, sawdust lit underneath, any holes closed over with corrugated and left to smoke for about 5 days. Our mouths were salivating at the thought - guessing they would have used redgum sawdust as that was the main tree utilised for everything in that area.



sounds amazing.
I wonder how the tree manages? ;) did they say how often they smoke a carcass? wish i could see something like that sounds so rustic and homesteady. great!

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Mon Jul 25, 2011 11:36 am
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
Never took a camera but here is a pic from their website - sure we have all seen old gums like this but never thought of that use.
Carole - should have explained that better - it was used in bygone days but unfortunately no longer! The farm has won non-built heritage awards for the trees and you can still see the iron peg and chains.
Apparently the trick is not to set the tree on fire so smoking is the operative word, not fire. Many of these old gums have these cavities from bushfires which never killed them off.


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Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:32 pm
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
Aurora wrote:
trick is not to set the tree on fire so smoking is the operative word, not fire. Many of these old gums have these cavities from bushfires which never killed them off.



now you have me thinking. i have a few trees just like this fairly close to the house- we may have to experiment and see - actually there is a good one in the boar paddock- may give those ramaging pigs something to think about if i smoke a few buddies right there......
kidding. bet the indigenous peoples used this method to preserve kangaroo, goanna and wallaby though. what do you think Cai? will we give it a whirl?

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Tue Jul 26, 2011 9:19 am
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
hey carol that would certainly encourage them to behave :lol:

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Tue Jul 26, 2011 7:44 pm
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
I have been struggling with my end of the bargain in keeping my pigs suitably housed as the winter has progressed. Every shelter we build- no matter how HEAVY, ends up being demolished by the pigs in a day or so :x , and then they sleep in the open :roll: .
They are in a new patch of paddock, and as usual they spend a day ‘cutting’ the tall grasses and making hay :!: . That’s what it seems to me anyway, they don’t eat it (they munch the roots)- but they pile it up into nests and snuggle in.
At night there will be lots of commotion as they push each other out of bed in an effort to not be the one left on top or on an outside edge of the pile :lol: .
It is amazing to see ten 200 kilo pigs stacked on top of each other snoring :lol: .
I was braving the minus 8 this morning taking Buttons and Simba for a stroll around their kingdom, and ended up at the pig yards- as usual everyone was squealing and jostling at the fence line to say “Where is my breakfast” when I saw (you know how you mentally count heads) the four smallest piglets were absent.
Mild panic as I race ahead to the ‘oh my gosh they are out again’ scenario in my head :cry: , blood pressure rising......
But after a few moments- possibly only 20 seconds- they emerged one by one from that tree I was telling you about- the possible smoking tree. :halo It seems they have discovered their own cosy little piglet cave away from the other bigger pigs......
How’s that? That space at the base of the tree must be bigger than I thought........

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Fri Jul 29, 2011 10:31 am
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
:lol: and it will be mighty cosy in there come smoking time!!

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Fri Jul 29, 2011 3:11 pm
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Post Re: Using native timbers for smoking meat
Hi there all
It was with curiosity I just read this thread on the old smoking methods.
We invested in a 6 rack smoke house on Ebay and its the best thing we ever bought.
I have to say that my son and I were drooling at the thought of smoking pork in that way.
I was told not to use ironbark woodchips :?: but I have combined redgum with the hickory chips but imagine the flavour this little pig had.
Any thoughts on various wood types.
The guy I bought the smoker off sends a news letter and apparrently grape vine is good (dry of course)
I also sourced the "dressing of the rabbitt" having been brought up on a farm,we ate wild bunny but it was always soaked overnight in a saltwater brine, and it was delicious.
The saltwater took that gamie taste away but it would have had to tenderise the meat :!:
I am on the hunt (excuse the punn) for some bunnie to smoke in the smoker.
Yumm. They are minblowingly expensive to buy. last one I looked at in Wagga was 37 bucks.
I will let you know how it goes...
All our meat for the smoker is brined for 12 hours (small cuts like chicken etc) and up to 24 hours for larger cuts like a half leg of pork.
Its disgustingly good and the whole neigbourhood can smell it cooking.
Gotta run


Wed Oct 26, 2011 3:09 pm
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