View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:15 pm



Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post 
Author Message
Sprout

Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:07 am
Posts: 18
Location: Canberra
Post Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
Hi Green-Thumbs,

I put together a wicking garden bed this weekend. I've read a bit about them and the idea seems to have merit, particularly for Canberra where plants wilt during hot dry days.

Here's a link to the blog post I wrote on how I put mine together:
http://wp.me/pDhV1-7F

No results yet (obviously), but I have high expectations.

EB

_________________
Garden Engineer, Poultry Wrangler and Energy Nerd.
@evcricket on the Twitters
http://evcricket.wordpress.com/


Sun Sep 25, 2011 8:37 pm
Profile WWW
Forum Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 6:18 pm
Posts: 1685
Location: Bayside suburbs Melbourne
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
You can always pop in a built in worm farm, using some plumbing pipe just a bit wider than that you have already used. You can see them in some of my threads about my raised beds.

_________________
Lots of pets, garden and cups of tea on the front porch. Farm in the suburbs.


Sun Sep 25, 2011 9:24 pm
Profile
Forum Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 1:37 pm
Posts: 2570
Location: Goulburn
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
That looks great.

I have ofetn pondered the water wastage in a conventional garden and which is why I have resurected my aquaponics system.

Perhaps you could add a small pump and circluate the water as well.

Suck it out of the bottom and feed it through a drip system along the top to adi the water distribution throughout the system - maight be helpfull for seedlings and things with a shallow root system?

_________________
Bernie
http://www.kombiclub.com


Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:02 pm
Profile
Sprout

Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:07 am
Posts: 18
Location: Canberra
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
Thanks All.

After some testing, it seems I didn't seal around the pipe well enough; some difficult work ahead of me this weekend to fix that!

I always do this too; want to get something finished in an amount of time, and rush it a bit. I should have left it a week and really tested the reservoir seal, then filled it in next weekend. Instead, I'll be excavating under the pipe and trying to fix the leak.

Silly Evan.

EB

_________________
Garden Engineer, Poultry Wrangler and Energy Nerd.
@evcricket on the Twitters
http://evcricket.wordpress.com/


Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:17 am
Profile WWW
Forum Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 1:37 pm
Posts: 2570
Location: Goulburn
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
:lol:

That sounds like something I would do!

I want it working and I want it working NOW ;)

Goodluck with the excavating :)

_________________
Bernie
http://www.kombiclub.com


Tue Sep 27, 2011 1:21 pm
Profile
Green Thumb

Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:01 pm
Posts: 904
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
I must say that your project looks very good. Well done :)

One point that I would disagree with you on in your blog however, is the need for a high nitrogen content. This would be good for leafy vegies (lettuce etc), but terrible for most others. Personally, I'd be going for low nitrogen, high phosporous and potassium (low N, higher P and K). You can always suppliment nitrogen as needed depending on what you are growing.

I am presuming that this is for raising/hardening seedlings? You may also want to consider venting this time of year, as even with the type of temperatures we are getting at the moment, it will get very very hot in that box. I did something similar last year and vry quickly had nothing but steamed seedlings.


Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:02 pm
Profile
Sprout

Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:07 am
Posts: 18
Location: Canberra
Post Re: Wicking Garden Bed - Blog Post
Gizzy, of course you are right, thanks for the reminder.

There is a section down the back where I ran the chooks for a while and I learnt about how high in nitrogen their poo is. Now the grass down there is extraordinary; was green all the way through winter and is now very lush. So, I learnt the value of nitrogen! But, now that you mention it, grass is a 'leafy green' and not a flowering or fruiting plant.

EB

_________________
Garden Engineer, Poultry Wrangler and Energy Nerd.
@evcricket on the Twitters
http://evcricket.wordpress.com/


Wed Sep 28, 2011 7:31 am
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 7 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.